Welcome Session (11 - 11:30a EST)

Welcome: IDEA in our information Schools

Session 1 (11:30a - 12:30p EST)

Session 1a: Information Technology Attitudes and Behaviors within Families: A Socioeconomic Perspective

Moderator:
Warren Allen, Rutgers University

Panelists:
Denise Agosto, Drexel University
Radhika Garg, Syracuse University
Gabrielle Salib, Drexel University
Matthew Symes, Drexel University

Summary: Parents are at a crossroads in navigating their children’s lives with technology, often caught between needing to assess risks of use and wanting to support technology access and skills. The impact of socioeconomic status (SES) creates an even more complex terrain to navigate. The session will begin with a discussion of impacts of SES on family IT practices. Workshop participants will then explore connections between SES and their own work, as well as shared directions for prioritizing SES diversity in the future of the field.

Session 1b: Algorithm Biases in the Analysis of Big Data

Moderator:
Catherine Cronquist Browning, University of California, Berkeley

Panelists:
Anita Say Chan, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Steve Wallace, Syracuse University

Summary: In this session we wish to discuss how to train designers/engineers to anticipate bias, rather than simply assuming it can be designed away, and to try to be as vigilant as possible to build in checks and support internal and external institutional checks (hire for a diverse population, support non-profits on your review board that include POC, support fund education programs that diversify job pools).

Initially, organizations getting ready to deploy a model can test for bias by expanding the model evaluation and testing process. They can do this by including external community groups as testers. These groups are in a better positions to ensure that the true accuracy and the false positive rate(s) produced by the models are consistent when comparing different social groups ie: gender, ethnicity, age etc.

In the long term, the only way to ensure that bias is not built into models is to expand the diversity of the model design and development teams. These expanded roles would be charged with anticipating potential areas of bias to ensure that it is never built into the models in the first place.

Session 2 (1:15 - 2:15p EST)

Session 2a: Making Critical Informatics Integral Within Undergraduate iSchool Curriculum

Moderator:
Warren Allen, Rutgers University

Panelists:
Britt Paris, Rutgers University
Rebecca Reynolds, Rutgers University
Megan Threats, Rutgers University

Summary: This session explores examples of critical informatics themes, cases and courses, as they have been incorporated by faculty in iSchool undergraduate program curricula. The panel will address how teaching from the standpoint of critical theories in the areas of race, gender, intersectionality, identity, health and mis- and dis-information can serve as anchoring, human-centered learning experiences that helps contextualize students' technical learning in iSchool curricula, in ways that importantly distinguish iSchools from other STEM/computing degrees.

Session 3 (2:15 - 3:15p EST)

Session 3a: The Diversity Mindset as a Driving Force in IS Scholarship and Practice

Moderator:
Nadia Caidi, University of Toronto

Panelists:
Nadia Caidi, University of Toronto
Keren Dali, University of Denver
Spencer Lilley, Victoria University, Wellington, NZ
Lisa Ndejuru, University of Toronto
Natalie Peng, National University of Singapore

Summary: While DEI are inseparable aspects of scholarship, professional practice, and education in the information fields, we do not always practice what we preach. In this session, the speakers will share their experiences in actively cultivating a diversity mindset, and will address how such a mindset can foster sustainable change and effective leadership in the areas of teaching and pedagogy; fostering equitable workplaces, and in enabling inclusive publishing and scholarly communication spaces.

Session 3b: Recruitment of Diverse Populations

Moderator:
Linda C. Smith, Interim Executive Associate Dean, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Panelists:
Kayla Booth, Director, iSchool Inclusion Institute (i3), School of Computing and Information, University of Pittsburgh
Victor Jones, Assistant Director of Recruitment and Diversity Initiatives, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Devon Keen, Director of Inclusion, Equity, and Outreach, University of Michigan School of Information
Moises Orozco Villicaña, Director of Enrollment Management, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Summary: This session will focus on best practices and the infusion of authentic relationships to recruit, support, and retain students of color. Panelists will share innovative approaches in their effort to advance diversity, inclusion, and equity in information schools.

Session 4 (3:45 - 4:45p EST)

Session 4a: Building a Diverse Public Interest Technology Field

Moderator:
Marie Fazio, Drexel University

Panelists:
Casey Fiesler, University of Colorado, Boulder
Deirdre Mulligan, University of California, Berkeley

Summary: An overview of several current public interest technology projects at UC Berkeley's I School, including supporting undergraduate interest in algorithmic justice in partnership with UC Berkeley's CalNERDS, a collection of diversity STEM programs and initiatives, and the D-Lab, a data-intensive social science initiative; interdisciplinary discussion and projects of the Algorithmic Fairness and Opacity Working Group (AFOG); and developing undergraduate curriculum in support of both diversity and the public interest.

Session 4b: Women in Tech: Strategies Across the Information Fields

Moderator:
Devon Keen, Director of Inclusion, Equity, and Outreach, University of Michigan School of Information

Panelists:
Sheila Clifford-Bova, Syracuse University
Michelle Rogers, Drexel University

Summary: The iSchools organization is a collective of Information Schools dedicated to advancing the information field in the 21st Century and creating tomorrow’s knowledge society. Together they share a fundamental interest in the relationships between information, people, and technology. During 2020, our commitment to these ideals are more relevant than ever – “working toward a society in which citizens collaboratively and freely create and share knowledge and utilize information and technology to promote growth, prosperity, and well-being.” One of the ongoing barriers to reaching these ideals is supporting the full participation of the populace. Now more than ever, there is a need to discuss how intersectionality, diversity, inclusion & equity play a role in the iSchool landscape. Changes to work practices because of remote working provide an opportunity to reconsider how work is imagined, designed, and evaluated.

Keynote Panel (4:45 - 5:45p EST)

Community-Engaged Research: Knowledge, Epistemologies, and Anti-Oppression

Moderator:
Martha A. Garcia-Murillo, Syracuse University

Panelists:
Negin Dahya, University of Toronto
Amelia Gibson, University of North Carolina
Beth Patin, Syracuse University